Paper Fortune Tellers - social skills games for children with ASD's (and other children too)

In this blog post, I show you how to make and use these simple folded devices for social skills activities.  I provide you the download PDF you need.

In this blog post, I show you how to make and use these simple folded devices for social skills activities. I provide you the download PDF you need.

 

Paper Fortune Tellers – social skills activity

When I was a  kid I saw girls playing with these things.  They called them “cootie catchers.”  A few weeks ago, I went on YouTube to learn how to make them.  It occurred to me that these things might be useful in social skills activities and counseling for children with high functioning autism.

Once I figured out the template, I made nine of them.  Here are the downloads for them:

Click here:  Social Skills Paper Fortune Teller Download

Another three Fortune Tellers, CBT / Anxiety Theme Fortune Teller

Another one, on Christmas theme: Christmas Social Skills Paper Fortune Teller – Download

How to use the Paper Fortune Tellers in social skills teaching activities:

Unlike  traditional paper fortune tellers, these are not used  for pretend fortune telling.  These are for helping children, working in pairs, to work on the skills of asking questions, giving compliments and talking about emotions.  One of them is to review self-help strategies for teasing and bullying.

Check out the photos and captions below so you can get some ideas on how these might be used in your own social skills groups and lessons. Click on the photo right below here for clear instructions, from  Carla Butorac, SLP on how to fold them and use them.

I hope you enjoy these things and that your students /clients find them useful.

Joel Shaul, LCSW

0 Paper Fortune Teller, therapist making one

Click on this photo to be connected to a video featuring Carla Butorac, SLP showing how to fold and use the paper fortune tellers.

This is what one looks like. In the pdf, I provide a link to a YouTube video in which a young girl provides a lucid demonstration of how to fold one of these things.

The same one, closer up. In the next photo, you see what happens if the child folds back the flap, “What is your favorite.”

The kid whose turn it is to ask a question then asks his partner, “What is your favorite video game?” The next turn, if this same question category is selected, then they go to B, later C and then D.

IMG_0863

…same procedure for this one.

 

 

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